Monday, 3 September 2012

Back in business

Sorry for the long delay in posting! I just had a lovely weekend in Bournemouth with a few of my friends from uni, watching the Air Festival and generally getting out and about. The muscles in my shoulders were starting to feel rock solid from sitting hunched over my keyboard, so it was great to have a break. I was spoiled rotten by the hosts. There was a bit of drama when the Bomb Disposal Unit arrived on the beach, and when I bumped into Optimus Prime en route to the fireworks, but otherwise it was very chilled. Though it did remind me how close I am to going back to uni and essays, and how little studying I've done.

The deadline for the next edit is tomorrow. The remaining changes are very minor, little continuity problems and so on. Alexa and Alexandra have said I've successfully brought back the punch and pace of the original MS. Now the editing is finished, I'm going to be introduced to my copyeditor, Justine Taylor. I'm told she has a real passion for fantasy, so I'm very excited to work with her. I'll be doing a chunky blog post on what copyediting involves once we get started.


I should have some more foreign rights deals to announce soon. I'm not allowed to discuss specific territories until I've signed the contract, but more are happening! 


If you have any more questions about the editing process, I'm now in a perfect position to answer them, so do ask if you're curious.

8 comments:

  1. What an exciting time for you! I'm looking forward to reading what you have to say on copyediting too. Really do appreciate the insight into the industry you've been giving us. I had no idea how much editing was involved *after* the offer of publication.

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    1. Glad you're enjoying it! And yes, huge amount of editing post-offer. I think there's a general belief that the editors just take it away and do it all for you...

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  2. Hi, I am from Australia. I have edited my story over and over again to the point of going insane. I researched books on editing, guidelines and whatever else I could find. So when I sent it off to an agent, thinking and preparing myself for the next step of the editing process, it came as a surprise to me that no one will even look at it unless appraised by a manuscript assessor. Just wondering if this is this the norm overseas?

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    1. Hi Andrew - That's very surprising. Definitely not like that in the UK. I read a lot of queries while working at DGA and not one claimed to have been professionally appraised. Some agents only accept 'solicited' manuscripts, i.e. a manuscript that the agent or editor has specifically asked to see, but definitely not heard of a problem with assessment.

      Perhaps you could ring one of the agencies to enquire about it? Or if they won't budge, try sending your MS overseas? I know some agents in the UK are willing to take clients from other territories. Bit more expensive, but probably not more than the cost of a full manuscript appraisal.

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  3. Look away children. Boo to going back to school. I can only imagine the will power it would take to study instead of write :) Congratulations on finishing the final, final edit and on your latest foreign rights deals.

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  4. What do you plan on doing after university, if you don't mind me asking? Does it depend on how well the Bone Season does?

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    1. Yes- I'd like to be a full-time writer.

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